Costas Invites & Welcomes Controversy Calling out Redskins Owner

Part of your personal branding is what you want your reputation to be. If you have a solid platform from which to create controversy, and are comfortable accepting the repercussions of your words, then go for it.  All too often I have people suggesting I teach them to never say a single contrary word and live a vanilla life. Far from it. I’ve always said that if you want to stand stark naked in the middle of the road at 2AM, covered in chicken feathers with your head painted green, and verbally spouting your love for Bea Arthur, the do it. Own it. Be it. BUT be prepared to face the consequences, positive and negative, of what you do.

Bob Costas is paid to deliver commentary, and he did just that in stating his opinion on the Washington NFL franchise using the nicknames “Redskins”. He considers it offensive, and knew his words would light a firestorm. It did, both from those who support his opinion and those who disagree. It will not have an effect on Costas’ job with NBC. He is a veteran and notable personality for NBC, and what he said broke no corporate rules. I will wager you Costas’ bosses knew exactly what he was going to say and had no problem with it. It’s his job, and it brought attention, meaning money and ratings, to NBC. The comment also broke no grounds of bad taste and was perfectly stated.

You, however, are not Bob Costas. You very likely have a job or public position where making such controversial comments could cost you your employment, your position in the community, friends and co-workers. Positively and negatively, of course. You need to make a valued judgement when and where you make such comments. Know your audience. Understand the ramifications of what you say. There is an excellent possibility you will be applauded for your forward thinking stand. There is also the excellent possibility you will be shunned for making what many might consider just a “populist” statement.

People will judge you not only by the way that you speak, but by your content. And in a world where everything can be recorded, repeated, and rumored to the point of mental exhaustion, you must think before you speak. Every single time.

INTELLIGENCE: UNDERSTAND THAT EVERYTHING YOU SAY CAN BE TAKEN POSITIVELY AND NEGATIVELY. YOU CAN BE HONORED OR SHUNNED FOR THE SAME WORDS BY DIFFERENT FACTIONS. KNOW YOUR AUDIENCE AND BE PREPARED TO FACE THE CONSEQUENCES OR REAP THE REWARDS OF EVERY SINGLE WORD.

Bob Costas: Redskins Name Undeniably a ‘Slur’

 

 

Bob Costas: Redskins Name Undeniably 'Slur'

NBC Sports anchor parses name controversy during ‘Sunday Night Football’

 

NBC Sports anchor Bob Costas weighed in forcefully Sunday on the controversy over the nature of the Washington Redskins’ name, which has stirred debate amid the  NFL team’s refusal to change its moniker.

 

In his half-time essay segment during NBC’s “Sunday Night Football” telecast of the Redskins-Dallas Cowboys game, Costas parsed the uproar over the Redskins and other sports franchise names that have been seen as insensitive in the modern era to various minority groups.

 

He noted that some teams have adjusted their names over the year’s in light of modern-day sensitivities, including other teams dubbed “Redskins,” a derogatory term for Native Americans.

 

Costas, an influential voice in the sports world, acknowledged that the name is used with “benign” intent in the present day by the team and its owner, Daniel Snyder. But he left no doubt about his reasoning on why there is a public campaign to pressure the team to change the name.

 

“Think for a moment about the term ‘Redskins,’ and how it truly differs from all the others.  Ask yourself what the equivalent would be, if directed toward African-Americans, Hispanics, Asians, or members of any other ethnic group,” Costas said.

 

“When considered that way, ‘Redskins’ can’t possibly honor a heritage, or noble character trait, nor can it possibly be considered a neutral term.  It’s an insult, a slur, no matter how benign the present-day intent. It is fair to say that for a long time now, and certainly in 2013, no offense has been intended. But, if you take a step back, isn’t it clear to see how offense “might” legitimately be taken?”

 

2018-01-01T01:17:05+00:00